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PSEXEC: A Powerful Tool for Remote Process Execution on a Text File List of Computers



How to Run PSEXEC.exe for a List of Computers Stored in a Text File




If you need to execute commands or processes on remote computers, you might have heard of PsExec, a portable tool from Microsoft that lets you do just that. PsExec can run any program on a remote computer using any user's credentials, without having to install any software on the target machine. You can also redirect the output of the remote program to your local computer, making it look like it's running locally.




Run psexec.exe for list of computers stored in text file



But what if you have a list of computers that you want to run the same command or process on? Do you have to type each computer name manually and wait for PsExec to finish before moving on to the next one? Not at all. PsExec has a handy feature that lets you specify a text file that contains the names of the computers you want to target. This way, you can run PsExec once and let it do the work for you.


How to Use PsExec with a Text File




Before you can use PsExec with a text file, you need to download it from Microsoft's website and extract it to a folder on your computer. You also need to make sure that both your local and remote computers have file and printer sharing enabled, and that you have access to the $admin share on the remote computers. You can check this by opening a Run dialog box (WIN+R) and typing \\\\computername\\admin$ , where computername is the name of the remote computer. If you can access this folder, you're good to go.


Next, you need to create a text file that contains the names of the computers you want to run PsExec on. You can use any text editor for this, such as Notepad. Each computer name should be on a separate line, and you can use either the full name (e.g., \\\\computername) or just the hostname (e.g., computername). Save the file with any name you like, such as computers.txt.


Now, open a Command Prompt window and navigate to the folder where you extracted PsExec. To run PsExec with a text file, you need to use the @file parameter, followed by the name of your text file. For example:


psexec @computers.txt -u admin -p password -c c:\\test.exe


This command will run test.exe on all the computers listed in computers.txt, using the admin account and password as credentials. The -c option will copy test.exe to the remote computers before running it. You can also use other options with PsExec, such as -i to run the program interactively on the remote desktop, -s to run it as System account, or -d to not wait for the program to terminate.


Benefits of Using PsExec with a Text File




Using PsExec with a text file has several benefits over running it manually for each computer. Some of them are:


  • You can save time and effort by not having to type each computer name repeatedly.



  • You can avoid typos and errors by using a pre-made list of computers.



  • You can run the same command or process on multiple computers simultaneously, without having to wait for each one to finish.



  • You can easily update or modify your list of computers by editing the text file.



  • You can reuse your text file for different commands or processes by changing only the PsExec parameters.



Conclusion




PsExec is a powerful tool for remote process execution that can help you manage and troubleshoot multiple computers at once. By using it with a text file, you can simplify and automate your tasks and save yourself some time and hassle. Whether you need to run a batch file, an executable, or a PowerShell script on a list of computers stored in a text file, PsExec can handle it for you.


How to Troubleshoot and Manage Remote Computers with PsExec




One of the benefits of using PsExec is that it can help you troubleshoot and manage remote computers without having to physically access them or install any software on them. You can use PsExec to run diagnostic tools, perform administrative tasks, or even install or uninstall programs on remote computers. Here are some examples of how you can use PsExec for troubleshooting and management purposes.


How to Run Diagnostic Tools with PsExec




If you need to run diagnostic tools on remote computers, such as IpConfig, Ping, or Tracert, you can use PsExec to run them and see the output on your local computer. For example, if you want to see the IP configuration of a remote computer, you can use this command:


psexec \\\\computername ipconfig /all


This will run IpConfig /all on the remote computer and display the output on your local computer. You can also use PsExec to run other diagnostic tools, such as Ping, Tracert, Nslookup, Netstat, or Tasklist.


How to Perform Administrative Tasks with PsExec




If you need to perform administrative tasks on remote computers, such as restarting them, shutting them down, or changing their registry settings, you can use PsExec to do that as well. For example, if you want to restart a remote computer, you can use this command:


psexec \\\\computername shutdown /r /t 0


This will run the shutdown command on the remote computer with the /r option to restart it and the /t 0 option to do it immediately. You can also use PsExec to run other administrative commands, such as Reg, Sc, Netsh, or Gpupdate.


How to Install or Uninstall Programs with PsExec




If you need to install or uninstall programs on remote computers, you can use PsExec to copy and run the executable files on them. For example, if you want to install a program called test.exe on a remote computer, you can use this command:


psexec \\\\computername -c c:\\test.exe


This will copy test.exe from your local computer to the remote computer and run it there. The -c option tells PsExec to copy the file before running it. You can also use PsExec to uninstall programs by running their uninstaller files.


Conclusion




PsExec is a versatile tool that can help you run commands or processes on remote computers with ease. By using it with a text file that contains a list of computers, you can simplify and automate your tasks and save yourself some time and hassle. Whether you need to troubleshoot, manage, install, or uninstall programs on a list of computers stored in a text file, PsExec can handle it for you.


How to Create and Use a Text File with PsExec




If you want to use PsExec with a text file that contains a list of computers, you need to create and format the text file properly. You also need to know how to use the @file parameter with PsExec to specify the text file. Here are some steps and tips on how to create and use a text file with PsExec.


How to Create a Text File with PsExec




To create a text file with PsExec, you can use any text editor, such as Notepad. The text file should contain the names of the computers you want to run PsExec on, one per line. You can use either the full name (e.g., \\\\computername) or just the hostname (e.g., computername). You can also use wildcards (e.g., \\\\*) or environment variables (e.g., %computername%) to specify the computers. For example, your text file might look like this:


\\\\computer1


\\\\computer2


computer3


computer4


\\\\*


%computername%


Save the text file with any name you like, such as computers.txt. You can save it in any location you want, but make sure you remember the path to it.


How to Use a Text File with PsExec




To use a text file with PsExec, you need to use the @file parameter, followed by the name and path of your text file. For example, if your text file is called computers.txt and it is located in C:\\_\\, you can use this command:


psexec @C:\\_\\computers.txt -u admin -p password -c c:\\test.exe


This command will run test.exe on all the computers listed in computers.txt, using the admin account and password as credentials. The -c option will copy test.exe to the remote computers before running it. You can also use other options with PsExec, such as -i to run the program interactively on the remote desktop, -s to run it as System account, or -d to not wait for the program to terminate.


Tips and Tricks for Using a Text File with PsExec




Using a text file with PsExec can make your life easier, but there are some tips and tricks that can help you avoid common pitfalls and errors. Here are some of them:


  • Make sure your text file is formatted correctly. Each computer name should be on a separate line, and there should be no blank lines or spaces in the file.



  • Make sure your text file is accessible from your local computer. If you store it on a network share or a remote computer, you might need to provide credentials or permissions to access it.



  • Make sure your text file is up-to-date. If you add or remove computers from your network, you might need to update your text file accordingly.



  • Make sure your text file is not too large. If you have hundreds or thousands of computers in your network, you might want to split your text file into smaller chunks or use filters or conditions to narrow down your target computers.



  • Make sure your text file is not empty. If your text file has no computer names in it, PsExec will run the command on your local computer only.



Conclusion




PsExec is a useful tool that can help you run commands or processes on remote computers with ease. By using it with a text file that contains a list of computers, you can simplify and automate your tasks and save yourself some time and hassle. Whether you need to troubleshoot, manage, install, or uninstall programs on a list of computers stored in a text file, PsExec can handle it for you.


How to Troubleshoot and Manage Remote Computers with PsExec




One of the benefits of using PsExec is that it can help you troubleshoot and manage remote computers without having to physically access them or install any software on them. You can use PsExec to run diagnostic tools, perform administrative tasks, or even install or uninstall programs on remote computers. Here are some examples of how you can use PsExec for troubleshooting and management purposes.


How to Run Diagnostic Tools with PsExec




If you need to run diagnostic tools on remote computers, such as IpConfig, Ping, or Tracert, you can use PsExec to run them and see the output on your local computer. For example, if you want to see the IP configuration of a remote computer, you can use this command:


psexec \\\\computername ipconfig /all


This will run IpConfig /all on the remote computer and display the output on your local computer. You can also use PsExec to run other diagnostic tools, such as Ping, Tracert, Nslookup, Netstat, or Tasklist.


How to Perform Administrative Tasks with PsExec




If you need to perform administrative tasks on remote computers, such as restarting them, shutting them down, or changing their registry settings, you can use PsExec to do that as well. For example, if you want to restart a remote computer, you can use this command:


psexec \\\\computername shutdown /r /t 0


This will run the shutdown command on the remote computer with the /r option to restart it and the /t 0 option to do it immediately. You can also use PsExec to run other administrative commands, such as Reg, Sc, Netsh, or Gpupdate.


How to Install or Uninstall Programs with PsExec




If you need to install or uninstall programs on remote computers, you can use PsExec to copy and run the executable files on them. For example, if you want to install a program called test.exe on a remote computer, you can use this command:


psexec \\\\computername -c c:\\test.exe


This will copy test.exe from your local computer to the remote computer and run it there. The -c option tells PsExec to copy the file before running it. You can also use PsExec to uninstall programs by running their uninstaller files.


Benefits of Using PsExec with a Text File




Using PsExec with a text file has several benefits over running it manually for each computer. Some of them are:


  • You can save time and effort by not having to type each computer name repeatedly.



  • You can avoid typos and errors by using a pre-made list of computers.



  • You can run the same command or process on multiple computers simultaneously, without having to wait for each one to finish.



  • You can easily update or modify your list of computers by editing the text file.



  • You can reuse your text file for different commands or processes by changing only the PsExec parameters.



Conclusion




PsExec is a powerful tool for remote process execution that can help you manage and troubleshoot multiple computers at once. By using it with a text file that contains a list of computers, you can simplify and automate your tasks and save yourself some time and hassle. Whether you need to run a batch file, an executable, or a PowerShell script on a list of computers stored in a text file, PsExec can handle it for you.


Conclusion




In this article, you learned how to run PsExec.exe for a list of computers stored in a text file. You also learned how to create and use a text file with PsExec, how to use various parameters and options with PsExec, and how to use environment variables and registry settings with PsExec. You also saw some examples of how to use PsExec for troubleshooting and management purposes. By using PsExec with a text file, you can simplify and automate your tasks and save yourself some time and hassle. PsExec is a versatile and powerful tool that can help you run commands or processes on remote computers with ease. 4e3182286b


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